Rhubarb

Rhubarb


Rhubarb was a valuable herb, long before it became a dessert ingredient baked in a pie or fashionably grilled with sugar.

Before the advent of cheap sugar in the 18th and 19th centuries, Rhubarb’s dark brown root was better known as a medicinal herb, and has been used by traditional herbalists in China for thousands of years. It features in a text book called The Divine Farmer’s Herb-Root Classic written in China about 2,700 years ago.

Rhubarb was introduced to the Europeans in the 14th century having been traded along the legendary Silk Road from China through the Middle East.

In traditional herbal medicine, therapeutic doses are most widely believed to have a positive effect upon the digestive system. A wide range of benefits have also been claimed in traditional herbal use which New Zealand and  Australian laws prevent us from mentioning to protect you from any inference that Ch’i might be a medicine

There are several modern research projects underway looking for evidence that the traditional uses and beliefs about Rhubarb are correct. Much of this research is pointing properties of the components of Rhubarb root which New Zealand and  Australian laws prevent us from mentioning to protect you from any inference that Ch’i might be a medicine. The Scottish Crop Research Institute published a report in 2010 on their work confirming high levels of beneficial antioxidants in cooked rhubarb.

Disclaimer: The above information is offered to give the background story and origin of the herbal ingredients in Ch’i. Ch’i International Limited do not make any claim that Ch’i Sparkling Herbal Refreshers are capable affecting any health condition with the exception of thirst.


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